Ki Yachol Nuchal!

New olah; mom and wife. In small ways, every day, trying to rectify the error in judgement of my zaydies, the meraglim. "See these big grapes? We can make really big wine!"

You may be a settler if…

Posted by rutimizrachi on 05/10/2008

Yom rishon, 6 Tishrei 5769.

Recently, Yisrael Medad posted (or reposted) an entertaining diversion which I enjoyed very much. My guys, being in touch with their “You may be a redneck” selves, got quite the kick out of it. I understand it now; and I know I wouldn’t have gotten most of the jokes last year. Go ahead. Test yourself. I’ll wait…

#*#*#*#*#*#*#*#*#*#*#*#*#*#*#*#*#*#*#*#*

As Sukkot approaches, as with other yomim tovim, I am enjoying the uniquely Israeli (and sometimes uniquely over-the-Green-Line) ways of doing things. As we know, as Rosh Hashana approaches, a Jewish man’s fancy turns to sukkah building.

The Dearly Beloved has been eyeing a piece of wood near the “Box Shul” for several days. “Hmmmm,” he said to me this morning, “if that piece of wood is still there after davening, it would look right nice as a wall panel for this here sukkah.” (It is interesting that The Dearly Beloved, who grew up in the midwest, sounds like he grew up in Hapeville, Georgia, at moments like this.)

Noticing he was empty-handed when he returned from shul, I casually asked, “Nu? What happened with the sukkah panel?”

“The early davener gets the wood,” he answered glumly.

I felt very bad for him, especially since this loss came on the heels of last week’s near international incident. He had spotted a clearly ownerless panel, and began to make off with it.
Apparently, the Arab builders felt they had previous dibs on the wood. “I can’t believe they use this kind of poor-quality junk for building our houses,” he snorted at me. “Why, I wouldn’t even use stuff like that for a sukkah.” I thought it politic to move on to other topics.

Happily, The Dearly Beloved is not easily daunted in his mission. “You know… that rusted metal door has been there for a while. If it’s still there tomorrow…”

You may be a settler if any piece of wood, metal, fabric or plastic looks mighty interesting, come sukkah-building season.

7 Responses to “You may be a settler if…”

  1. lisacat said

    I also have seen the “You may be a settler if…” list and I love it. As for sukkah parts, as a fellow “Tightwad Gazette” fan and dumpster diver, I certainly understand the disappointment when something disappears. I wish you all good hunting in this important endeavor.
    Lisa

  2. rickismom said

    You don’t have to be a settler to want to put up a sukkah from scratch….

  3. rutimizrachi said

    Lisacat: Thank you. In these economically challenging times (read that: with no Home Depot nearby), I consider that a bracha.

    Rickismom: True. He even used to put up a quite lovely sukkah (from scratch) in Baltimore. It’s the eyeballing of the stray wood, willing it to be hefker, that is new to us. Though — without the cedars of Lebanon readily available — this experience may be the same for Israeli city dwellers. I’ll wait for their Sukkot posts to find out.

  4. YMedad said

    Glad to have been an inspiration

  5. Miriam's Blog said

    We made aliyah 14 years ago and lived on our daughter’s Kibbutz, Rosh Tzurim. I remember my husband and son putting up our first sukkah. The excitement, the anticipation of sitting in our sukkah on our holy land. Using stones and bricks to make the land even, when it was so uneven. For us, that first night of Yom Yov, when we made Kiddush, was the most wonderful feeling in the world. Shana Tova. Gmar Chatima Tova. Miriam

  6. Miriam's Blog said

    We made aliyah 14 years ago and lived on our daughter’s Kibbutz, Rosh Tzurim. I remember my husband and son putting up our first sukkah. The excitement, the anticipation of sitting in our sukkah on our holy land. Using stones and bricks to make the land even, when it was so uneven. For us, that first night of Yom Yov, when we made Kiddush, was the most wonderful feeling in the world. Shana Tova. Gmar Chatima Tova. Miriam

  7. Mrs. S. said

    The early davener gets the wood.
    New olim are at a distinct disadvantage at moments like these, because new olim don’t grow up scavenging, collecting and hoarding wood for their Lag BaOmer bonfires…

    Have an easy fast and a gmar chatimah tovah.

Leave a Reply

Fill in your details below or click an icon to log in:

WordPress.com Logo

You are commenting using your WordPress.com account. Log Out /  Change )

Google photo

You are commenting using your Google account. Log Out /  Change )

Twitter picture

You are commenting using your Twitter account. Log Out /  Change )

Facebook photo

You are commenting using your Facebook account. Log Out /  Change )

Connecting to %s

 
%d bloggers like this: